Shipping-Container Design for Vibrant Communities

Studio One Eleven architects are using cargo containers as an architectural blank slate from which to build upon.
17 / 12 / 2018
For more information, visit Studio One Eleven website.
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Design firm Studio One Eleven is significantly expanding the use of repurposed shipping containers with multiple projects throughout Southern California. And it’s not difficult to understand why: the region has excess shipping containers and some small-scale venues are able to purchase them for more decent prices.

For Michael Bohn, Senior Principal in Studio One Eleven, “creating retail with re-used containers not only allows more cost-effective and sustainable development – especially for independent retailers – it also helps build social cohesion and a compelling sense of place to help strengthen community.” The practice aims to regenerate neighborhoods, expanding beyond restaurants to incorporate dynamic trends.

The Roost, one of Orange County’s first shipping containers project, is a great example - those pre-war building were renovated in 2015, becoming a mix of shops and housing. Nowadays, shipping containers serve as bar and restaurant and are artfully arranged in a central beer garden and outdoor dining experience. But there are others examples - SteelCraft, in Long Beach, opened in 2016 and houses eight tenants, including independent pizza, dessert, coffee and brewery vendors. In 2019, the place will include a downtown site and a parabolic wooden shade, offering an organic farm, a large performance stage and vertical surface for outdoor movies.